Volume 1 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the First International Cilia in Development and Disease Scientific Conference (2012)

Open Access

The molecular mechanisms of calcium signalling in Chlamydomonas flagella

  • PW Collingridge1,
  • G Wheeler1 and
  • C Brownlee1
Cilia20121(Suppl 1):P19

DOI: 10.1186/2046-2530-1-S1-P19

Published: 16 November 2012

The motile green alga, Chlamydomonas, has long been used as a model system to understand flagella structure and function. In addition to the well characterised roles of cilia and flagella in motility, cell biologists are becoming increasingly aware of their importance as cellular sensors. Ca2+-dependent signalling mechanisms are associated with many flagellar processes, although in many cases the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Whilst Chlamydomonas possesses many genetic and biochemical advantages for the study of flagella, imaging Ca2+ in this alga has proven to be problematic. We have developed techniques to introduce Ca2+ responsive fluorescent dyes into Chlamydomonas cells via biolistics, which enables us to routinely and robustly image Ca2+ in both the cytosol and in the flagella. To visualise Ca2+ elevations within the flagella, we have developed imaging techniques using Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. This approach allows us to specifically image fluorescence from the flagella at high spatial and temporal resolution in the absence of interfering fluorescence from the cell body. We have found that Chlamydomonas flagella exhibit a range of dynamic Ca2+ elevations in response to different stimuli. Each flagellum demonstrates the ability to generate Ca2+ elevations independently from each other, suggesting a level of control in Chlamydomonas flagella signalling processes not previously demonstrated. We are currently using RNAi approaches to assess the contribution of different flagella-localised ion channels to these Ca2+ signalling processes.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
The Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Copyright

© Collingridge et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2012

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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